New Addition: The jenny has arrived.

This morning’s adventure took me somewhere I’d been before to do something I’ve never done before: help load a miniature donkey on the back of a pick-up truck. With the Jenny secured, we started for home. It was fairly mild with heavy cloud and fog cover. The rain held off, but the fog was thick and the drizzle was persistent going over Nuttby Mountain.

All the way home, I looked back as much as forward to check on the ‘young girl’. Mayzie, born in May 2010, was our first miniature donkey. She was a little frightened during the trip and probably missed her home and her family, but what she didn’t know was that she was going to a place where she’d be the centre of attention.

Miniature donkeys are herd animals, so they love company. When my nephew heard we were getting one, he said his friend had one and it was annoying. I asked him if his friend had other animals to keep the donkey company. No, he hadn’t. Oh.

At this moment, we don’t have another animal in the barn to keep the jenny company, but my three young children will keep it busy during the day. And my five Ameraucana chickens will be out in the barn in their own pen in about two weeks. The jenny should enjoy the presence of chickens because her former home contained many chickens, roosting where she slept and pecking around her grazing yard.

Diane Lynn Tibert

My homemade donkey carrier, or as others have joked “Ass Hauler”.

Other animals will soon arrive, too, just as soon as their old enough to leave their mothers.

The jenny took a few minutes to get out of the carrier in the back of the truck when she arrived at her new home. That’s not surprising since donkeys are known for their caution. Once off, she was happy to walk down the driveway with me. Then she spent about twenty minutes sniffing around the door to the barn. Once her curiosity was filled, she easily walked into her stall. I filled her bucket with water, she took a few drinks and then walked around her new home.

Diane Lynn Tibert

Mayzie is a weanling, a young donkey weaned from her mother.

When the kids arrived home from school, their first stop was the barn. They hung around, going in and out, talking with the jenny, patting her and giggling at her actions of going under the hay net until supper time. After supper, they were back out there, checking to see if she was okay and patting her again. Just before the last of the light left the sky, we checked on her one last time. She had eaten about half the hay I’d put in, so she was eating and drinking and licking her salt lick. I refreshed her water, the kids said good-night and we closed the barn for the night.

It’s very windy out tonight and the rain is beating against the windows. My youngest heard the donkey eyore and was worried she was scared. I told him she probably was a little scared because she’s in a new place without her family, but I assured him she would be okay. The sound of the wind might bother her a bit, but she was in a windless and dry place for the night.

I know first thing in the morning, the kids will be up and out of bed before their usual time, and will have a look in at their new pet before boarding the bus. I think that’s the way it will be for a long time by the looks of the smiles around the kitchen table tonight and the chatter as they went off to bed.

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2 thoughts on “New Addition: The jenny has arrived.

    • Mayzie’s been here a week and they’re still fighting over who gets to pick up the poo. In other words, they all want to do it. It’s great fun to watch. It should be an interesting summer.

      Thanks for commenting.

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